Disaster resource center opens for victims involved in fatal fire at Chesapeake Crossing

CHESAPEAKE, Va. - It's been nearly a week since many people lost their homes due to the fire at the Chesapeake Crossing Senior Apartment Complex.

A disaster resource center is open at The New Galilee Missionary Baptist Church through the weekend.

The Red Cross and other organizations, including Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia, Meal on Wheels America and the Salvation Army Hampton Roads Area Command, are providing assistance and hope for the 150 seniors that lost their homes and belongings.

"I need furniture; I need everything because I lost everything, but God is good," said Barbara Peppers, a resident of the apartment complex who was displaced by the fire. "He'll watch out for me."

Peppers is a diabetic and mentioned she hasn't had a good meal since last week. She and other victims took advantage of what's inside the disaster resource center.

"[There are] snacks in there for us to eat," Peppers added. "The police department was giving out IDs and people that lost their ID's and driver's license."

"Of course we have case workers from the American Red Cross, health services, mental health services in case they need to talk to us," said Red Cross Disaster Program Manager Perla Santillan.

The Red Cross said it's the largest relief center they've put on since Hurricane Matthew hit Hampton Roads last year.

Senior were also provided transportation to the center.

Victims only hope the resources provided can help get their life back to normal.

"Hopefully by the end of this month or by the end of next month I'll have somewhere to stay," Peppers said.

The disaster resource center will be open though the weekend from 9 a.m to 5 p.m until July 23.

However, the Red Cross said they will continue to provide individual assistance to those that need it.

 

Related:

Three dead after massive fire at Chesapeake senior living complex

Lightning blamed for deadly Chesapeake apartment fire

‘I heard no fire alarms’: Chesapeake tenants say they escaped fire because of neighbors, not alarms