Navy Senior Chief pleads not guilty to stealing subordinate Sailors’ identities

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NORFOLK, Va. –  Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Clayton Pressley III pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to federal charges of bank fraud, aggravated identity theft, and unlawfully possessing identity documents.

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Clayton Pressley III

Pressley was indicted for the charges on May 4.

Court documents state that he allegedly used personal information of two Sailors who were his subordinates to get fraudulent loans and credit cards totaling about $24,000.

The Massachusetts native was working at the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6 in Virginia Beach.

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service agents started their investigation in October 2015 after the first victim came forward claiming that his identity was used to apply for credit cards and loans.

Court documents state that the bank started their own investigation and asked the victim if he was familiar with the name “Clayton Pressley.”

Another victim contacted NCIS in January 2016 to report that he was the victim of fraud and he believed his former supervisor, Pressley, was responsible.

Court documents indicate that, as the supervisor of both victims, Pressley had access to their social security numbers, addresses, phone numbers and pay information based on their time of service and rank.

The two victims are not identified in the court documents.

Pressley has been with the Navy since April 1997. He is an explosive Ordnance Disposal Warfare Specialist and Enlisted Expeditionary Warfare Specialist.

Along with the Bronze Star he has received the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal and the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

At his arraignment, Pressley demanded a trial by jury. The trial is scheduled to begin on July 19.

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Navy Sailor, Bronze Star recipient indicted for stealing subordinate Sailors’ identities