Data shows which Virginia Beach schools had most water sources with elevated levels of lead

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - Bayside High School and Bayside Middle School both had the most water sources with elevated levels of lead, according to data provided by Virginia Beach City Public Schools.

Both of the schools had six water sources with lead levels above 15 parts per billion (ppb), which is the federal and state limit. The data shows the school division has since taken steps to mitigate the levels of lead, including in some cases replacing the sources.

Last week, school leaders announced testing had shown elevated levels of lead in water at 27 schools. Since then, they've revised the data, saying some water sources identified as drinking sources were not in fact for drinking water.

Among the sources with issues, the main entrance water fountain at Bayside High School originally showed 19.3 ppb lead. A retest then showed 289 ppb. The school system says they will remove the fountain, but in the meantime, it's been secured.

The water source with the highest level of lead was a kitchen sink at Malibu Elementary School. Testing showed levels of 614 ppb, about 41 times the limit. Data shows the source was replaced, and now testing shows levels below 1 ppb.

Last week, school leaders announced testing had shown elevated levels of lead in water at 27 schools. Since then, they've revised the data, saying some water sources identified as drinking sources were not in fact for drinking water.

The schools removed from the list include First Colonial High School, Pembroke Meadows Elementary School, and Thalia Elementary School.

On Tuesday, the school system announced nine additional water sources had been identified as having actionable levels of lead. The sources were identified at schools already impacted.

"It is important to note that VBCPS has been advised by the Virginia Beach Department of Public Health and the University of Virginia’s Clinical Toxicology Program that, based upon reported water lead concentrations, the risk of elevated lead concentrations in children solely from school water consumption, is very low," the school system said in a message to parents.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.