Taking action for your health: Food intolerance vs. Food allergy

Have you ever heard someone say that he`s 'a little' allergic to a particular food?

Consumer Reports says there`s no such thing. A food intolerance is more likely. And while some of the symptoms of an allergy and a food intolerance are similar, the differences between the two are critical!

So why the confusion?

A food intolerance affects the digestive system, and allergies attack the immune system. Helping to identify whether it`s an intolerance or an allergy is important because it can make your quality of life much better.

People with intolerances can still eat certain foods without serious consequences. But for someone with an allergy, touching, inhaling, or ingesting even a microscopic amount of an allergenic food can be deadly.

If you suspect there`s a problem, see an allergist to make sure it`s not a food allergy, which can be severe and even fatal. If it`s not a food allergy, it`s important to keep a log of your symptoms, your diet, and the foods that make you feel unwell so that you can share it with your
doctor.

CR says an intolerance can stem from a variety of sources, such as celiac disease or a sensitivity to food additives. It may cause discomfort, but it`s not fatal.

You can develop food allergies and intolerances AFTER childhood. Nearly half of those with food allergies in the study reported the onset of a new one in adulthood.

If you have a food allergy, you need to take certain precautions, such as carrying medication in case you have a reaction.

If you or a loved one have a food allergy, be careful in the kitchen, especially if you handle utensils tainted with food that might trigger a reaction. And remember to clean surfaces with warm and soapy water and wash your hands properly.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.