Hampton University School of Nursing volunteers at free Annual Prostate Cancer Early Detection Event

HAMPTON, Va. – The students and faculty from Hampton University’s School of Nursing volunteered at the Annual Free Prostate Cancer Early Detection Event on Saturday, February 2.

The event was hosted at Queen Street North Worship Center in Hampton, Va. where Prostate Specific Antigen tests and Digital Rectal Exams were given.

The ‘Save Our Men’ event was said to be an initiative for men with a family history of prostate cancer.

African Americans are said to be at the highest risk of having prostate cancer and should be screened much earlier than other men should.

“It is projected that cancer will outpace population growth in Virginia for the next 25 years. The Hampton Roads area has been heavily affected by prostate cancer. Each year, the Hampton University School of Nursing volunteers for this cancer event as a way to give back to those people who are unaware of the severity of this disease. We are proud to say that the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute has the resources to help fight this sickness to save men in our local community,” said Hampton University President, Dr. William R. Harvey.

Here are a few facts about Prostate Cancer:

  • Many men die with prostate cancer, but not from it.
  • Although it has not been proven conclusively, it is thought that a diet high in fats could lead to increased testosterone production.
  • Lack of exercise can lead to general ill-health and makes someone more susceptible to all sorts of diseases, prostate problems included.
  • A man with three first degree relatives with prostate cancer has a ten times increased risk of developing prostate cancer himself.
  • The prostate needs time and male hormones to develop cancer. Testosterone does not cause prostate cancer, but is essential for prostate cancer to develop.
  • Men whose mothers or sisters have developed breast cancer are also at increased risk for prostate cancer.
  • Because prostate cancer generally takes so long to develop, many doctors opt for the so-called ‘watchful waiting’ as a treatment option.
  • Besides castration at a young age, which is obviously not a viable option, there is no certain way of preventing prostate cancer.

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