Hampton community members help neighbors cope after tragedy with R.E.S.E.T. program

HAMPTON, Va. - Rapid engagement of support in the event of trauma: It’s called R.E.S.E.T., and city leaders say it gives average citizens a chance to serve their community after a violent crime.

“Community engagement is extremely important because crime does not just affect the individual who was personally affected by that crime; it affects the entire community," says Hampton Commonwealth's Attorney Anton Bell.

That ripple effect holds true to even the city’s most recent traumatic experience: Friday night’s shooting on Shell Road and Bell Road that sent a 21-year-old to the hospital with multiple gunshot wounds.

Neighbors in the area – too afraid to show their face in fear of retaliation - say violence is a reoccurring issue in their community.

R.E.S.E.T. members say it’s not a trauma response where officials want to know information about what happened during that case, but rather a response to trauma letting community members know that the city cares.

“Even though police officers are around when we walk with them, this is really not anything about going out to find a witness or statements or anything along those lines. But it’s really trying to connect city services to those who might be suffering," says Chief Terry Sult, Hampton Police Department.

It’s all in an effort to have a positive presence felt and for people going through trauma to understand and know they are never alone.