Here’s what military branches have announced about new parental leave policies

WASHINGTON, D.C. - How much time new parents can take off work following the birth or adoption of a child is changing in many of the military branches.

The Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Air Force have all announced changes to parental leave policies this month. The changes come in accordance with the Department of Defense Military Parental Leave Program.

The policies were authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017.

The policy changes are being published in response to this Department of Defense policy that was published in March.

So far the Army has not shared any changes.

Here's what each branch has announced so far:

Air Force 

The new policy for the Air Force outlines three forms of leave: maternity convalescent leave, primary caregiver leave, and secondary caregiver leave.

Caregiver leave is given in addition to the convalescent leave.

The new policy applies to birth mothers and fathers, same-sex couples, as well as adoptive and surrogate parents.

Maternity convalescent leave remains six weeks, primary caregiver leave is six weeks, and secondary caregiver leave increases from ten days to 21 days.

Primary and secondary caregiver leave can be taken any time within the first year after a child's birth or adoption.

Airmen have the ability to determine which parent is the primary and secondary caregiver.

The policy is effective immediately and retroactive to December 23, 2016.

Coast Guard 

The new parental leave policy for the Coast Guard also outlines three forms of leave: maternity convalescent leave, primary caregiver leave, and secondary caregiver leave.

Caregiver leave is given in addition to the convalescent leave.

The new policy applies to birth mothers and fathers, same-sex couples, as well as adoptive and surrogate parents.

Maternity convalescent leave is six weeks, primary caregiver leave is six weeks, and secondary caregiver leave increases from ten days to 21 days.

Coast Guardsmen have the ability to determine which parent is the primary and secondary caregiver.

"The strength of our Coast Guard families determines the strength of our Coast Guard," said Adm. Karl L. Schultz, Coast Guard commandant.  "That's why time off to care for new family members is really a readiness issue.  Our members need - and deserve - time to bond with their new child and adjust to new routines so they can return to work ready to keep the nation safe."

The policy is effective immediately and retroactive to December 23, 2016.

Marine Corps 

The new policy for the Marine Corps outlines three forms of leave: maternity convalescent leave, primary caregiver leave, and secondary caregiver leave.

Caregiver leave is given in addition to the convalescent leave.

The new policy applies to birth mothers and fathers, same-sex couples, as well as adoptive and surrogate parents.

Maternity convalescent leave remains six weeks, primary caregiver leave is six weeks, and secondary caregiver leave is now 14 days.

Primary and secondary caregiver leave can be taken any time within the first year after a child's birth or adoption.

Marines have the ability to determine which parent is the primary and secondary caregiver.

The policy is effective immediately and retroactive to December 23, 2016.

Navy 

The new policy for the Navy mirrors that of the Marine Corps and outlines three forms of leave: maternity convalescent leave, primary caregiver leave, and secondary caregiver leave.

Caregiver leave is given in addition to the convalescent leave.

The new policy applies to birth mothers and fathers, same-sex couples, as well as adoptive and surrogate parents.

Maternity convalescent leave remains six weeks, primary caregiver leave is six weeks, and secondary caregiver leave is now 14 days.

Primary and secondary caregiver leave can be taken any time within the first year after a child's birth or adoption.

Sailors have the ability to determine which parent is the primary and secondary caregiver.

"Navy's parental leave program supports Sailor 2025's goal of removing obstacles that negatively influence a Sailor's decision to stay Navy when they are looking to start or raise a family," according to a statement from the Navy.

The policy is effective immediately and retroactive to December 23, 2016.