As he prepares to leave Redskins after six seasons, QB Kirk Cousins publishes farewell letter

Kirk Cousins of the Washington Redskins warms up. (Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON – As the NFL’s free agency period begins and the Redskins prepare to move-on from starting quarterback Kirk Cousins, the QB published a goodbye letter to the ‘Skins and their fans Monday.

In his note, published on KirkCousins.org, Cousins writes, “The team has decided to move on to another option and, in turn, my family and I will be moving on as well. Knowing I will not be putting on a Redskins jersey next season, it’s hard to look back at all that’s taken place and not become emotional.”

Cousins went 26-30-and-1 as Redskins starting QB. He started every game the past three seasons, leading Washington to the playoffs in 2015 – his only postseason appearance. The Redskins lost to the Packers in the 2015 NFC Wild Card game.

Kirk Cousins of the Washington Redskins.
(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

“Though we are ultimately measured on a win-loss record, my fondest memories will be the little achievements and struggles that got us there…the everyday memories that made the job fun,” Cousins added. “Just like you never fully leave your hometown — you never fully leave your first NFL team, especially after six seasons.”

In January, the Redskins agreed to trade for Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith – opening the door for Cousins to depart as a free agent. Cousins, who played on a one-year contract each of the past two seasons, is the first QB in NFL history to receive the franchise tag two straight seasons.

“My family and I will always have a piece of Washington deep in our hearts,” Cousins wrote. “I arrived as a single, 23-year-old from the Midwest — with a lot to learn and prove. I now leave as a husband of four years to my wife, Julie, and a father to my son, Cooper — but still with lots to learn and prove. When Cooper someday asks: “Hey Dad, what was it like playing for the Redskins?” I’ll proudly tell him it was a dream come true.”

Cousins’ letter in its entirety:

Farewell, Washington

 As I’m about to make one of the bigger decisions of my life, I’ll be saying goodbye to my familiar life as a Redskin. After calling Washington home for the past six years, the team has decided to move on to another option and, in turn, my family and I will be moving on as well.

Knowing I will not be putting on a Redskins jersey next season, it’s hard to look back at all that’s taken place and not become emotional. I will forever be grateful to Mike Shanahan for taking a chance on me in the 2012 draft. At the time, many people saw his selection as foolish. Time proved otherwise and taught me that there are no guarantees in this business — if you work hard and learn from your mistakes, good things can happen. For the first time in 11 years I will participate in choosing where I play. Having said this, I would not trade the past decade for anything.

I am filled with gratitude over the unwavering support and devotion from you, the fans, both on and off the field. I’ll never forget how you stormed Redskins Park at 3 a.m. to welcome us home from Philadelphia after clinching the NFC East in 2015. I’ve never been so happy to have my car mobbed. You made “You Like That!” a catchphrase and your boundless generosity helped us raise tens of thousands of dollars for International Justice Mission to protect victims of violence all over the world — No words will express the depth of my gratitude, but “thank you” will have to do for now.

Though we are ultimately measured on a win-loss record, my fondest memories will be the little achievements and struggles that got us there…the everyday memories that made the job fun. I’ll miss Trent Williams’ clever one-liners at a teammate’s poor fashion choices (mostly mine) … breakfast with Scherff and Sundberg …Tress Way’s trivia games … Ryan Kerrigan’s consistency … Jordan Reed’s horrible ping pong (but amazing routes) … Chatting with Jamison Crowder & Josh Doctson in the cold tub …“Dunkin’ Fridays” with Colt McCoy… and on and on.

Just like you never fully leave your hometown — you never fully leave your first NFL team, especially after six seasons. My family and I will always have a piece of Washington deep in our hearts. I arrived as a single, 23-year-old from the Midwest — with a lot to learn and prove. I now leave as a husband of four years to my wife, Julie, and a father to my son, Cooper — but still with lots to learn and prove.

There is no way I would be where I am today without the leadership of the Redskins organization … Coach Gruden, Bruce Allen, Dan Snyder. Thank you all for the opportunity you gave me. When Cooper someday asks: “Hey Dad, what was it like playing for the Redskins?” I’ll proudly tell him it was a dream come true.

Thanks for having me, Washington, and thanks for making me into the player I am today!