Virginia radio host George Maida killed on interstate

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

George Maida, who hosted The Electric Croude and Classical Evening on WCVE The Community Idea Stations, died Saturday morning on Interstate 85. Maida was headed south in his 1997 Honda Civic, and was in Mecklenburg County, near the Virginia-North Carolina state line, when his car ran off the interstate, struck an embankment, and landed in a creek below the highway, according to Virginia State Police.

The 62-year-old radio host was pronounced dead at the scene, CBS 6 reported.

"George was a good man and a personal friend. He loved the station and he loved this company. The Electric Croude was his idea and he had developed a loyal and consistent audience," Community Idea Stations CEO Curtis Monk said. "As we have all learned in various ways, life has a way of dealing the cards in unexpected, unpredictable, and decidedly unplanned ways. The loss of a colleague and friend triggers a grieving process that must be traveled and each individual must travel that path as is best for them. For some, it will take more time than others. There is no prescribed set of seconds, minutes, hours, days, or weeks for the process but time is a great healer and, at some point, the memories of a life well lived replace the short term loss of a physical presence. Remember him with respect and honor him with laughter, music, and a toast to life."

In addition host duties on The Electric Croude and Classical Evening, he worked served as afternoon drive time host of All Things Considered for more than two decades.

"George was an award-winning producer, musician and composer who collected and played a wide variety of musical instruments. His musical group the Electric Croude Bande was featured in one of the four performances hosted this year at VCU in the Guitar and Other Strings concert series," a Community Idea Station spokesperson said. "He organized and hosted two well-attended, multi-artist musical revues at the WCVE studios celebrating The Electric Croude, one in the late 1990s and one celebrating the show’s 30th anniversary in 2015."

George's friends and fans posted their memories and condolences on the station's Facebook page.

"Words can't express the sorrow of losing such a dear friend," Eddie Eicher wrote. "The world has lost one of its truly unique souls, and heaven has gained one."

"George lived and breathed music as a multi faceted musician, writer, historian with so much knowledge eager to share with anyone who'd listen," Martin Vincent added. "George was selfless with no agenda other than to bring love into this world thru music. His loss leaves a gaping hole in my heart."

The Electric Croude was broadcast Saturdays at 10 p.m.