Celebrate Pi(e) Day with these delicious deals

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It’s March 14–a day also known as National Pi(e) day.

A quick refresher: Pi (or π if you want to get technical) is defined as the distance around a perfect circle, or the circumference, divided by the distance across it, or the diameter. It is also involved in calculating the area of a circle, the volume of a sphere, and many other mathematical formulas you might need in the sciences.

To celebrate, here are some special National Pi(e) Day offers:

  • Villa Italian Kitchen: Participating Villa Italian Kitchen locations across the country are offering full-size Neapolitan cheese pizzas for $3.14. Go to VillaItalianKitchen.com/Promotions to download a coupon.
    • Located at 701 Lynnhaven Parkway in Virginia Beach and Patrick Henry Mall in Newport news
  • Your Pie: $3.14 pizzas, combos and craft beers.
  • Whole Foods: $3.14 off large bakery pies and take-and-bake pizzas throughout the day while supplies last.
  • Blaze Pizza: Build your own artisanal pizza for $3.14.
    • Located at 5134 Main Street in Williamsburg, Va. (New Town Shopping Center)
  • Bojangles: Selling three sweet potato pies for $3.14
  • Boston Market: Guests who bring in Pi Day coupon on National Pi Day can enjoy a free rotisserie chicken pot pie with the purchase of any individual meal and drink. Download the coupon here.
  • Half.com: Get 95% off the paperback version of “The Life of Pi.”
  • ThinkGeek: Get a free Pi Day t-shirt when you order $31.41 worth of merchandise by using code PIOUS

Where Pi Day began

If you want to go where the day is said to be “invented,” look no further than San Francisco’s Exploratorium. Larry Shaw, who worked in the electronics group at the museum, began the tradition in 1988. Last year was Pi Day’s 25th anniversary there.

Pi Day began as a small gathering with mostly museum staff. Now it’s a public pi extravaganza featuring a “Pi procession,” whose attendees get a number — 0 to 9 — and line up in the order of pi’s digits: 3.14159265 … you get the idea.

The parade ends at the “pi shrine” — a pi symbol with digits spiraling around it embedded in the sidewalk, which was unveiled last year.