Virginia gas prices will spike if no action is taken soon

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Richmond, Va. – The Commonwealth enjoys some of the nation’s lowest gas prices, but that may not last for long.

One of the major reasons for this is a lower gas tax that was passed when the General Assembly approved its historic transportation bill in 2013.

But that may soon be changing because Richmond leaders believed Washington would pass new internet tax requirements, according to our sister station WTVR.

Buried in the Virginia transportation legislation, which also raised the state sales tax, was a caveat which stipulated that if Congress didn’t pass “E-Fairness legislation,” Virginia’s gas tax would increase January 1st 2015 – by 45 percent!

E-Fairness is a proposed bill that would require Internet sites to collect sales taxes when selling goods, as opposed to leaving it customers to report the sale on their own.

“The likelihood of them passing this is very low right now,” said State Senator John Watkins (R-Powhatan).

“It would of been probably a lot cleaner if we had just put the additional percentage in to begin with, and not base our assumptions on what Congress would or would not do,”

7 comments

  • Denver George Land

    “It would of been probably…” How am I supposed to take you seriously, as a news organization, with this type of butchering of the English Language being so common on your site? ‘It would HAVE been…’ would be the proper wording. HIRE AN EDITOR WHO KNOWS HIS OR HER JOB, AND HAS A MASTERY OF THE LANGUAGE THEY ARE EDITING!!!!

    (FYI… I am available, full time, for a respectable salary and benefits.)

    • Michael Marushia

      No wonder you’re available. Any editor worth his or her salt would have seen that the sentence to which you referred was surrounded by quotation marks, indicating, of course, that it was a quotation, not the words of the piece’s author. A quote, by definition, are the exact words uttered or written by the person making the quote. How are we supposed to take you seriously when you can’t even attribute the sentence to the correct person?

      • Denver George Land

        Michael, before you go picking on my comment, you might want to think logically about the situation for a few minutes. First, I didn’t attribute the sentence to anyone, but, since you brought it up, I will. Do you really believe that Senator Watkins wrote the quote down for the reporter who was writing the story? No, I’m fairly certain he didn’t. So, the quote was documented by Mr. Knight, either at the time of the interview, or based on an audio recording of the interview at a later time. I’m quite certain that what came out of Senator Watkins’ mouth was ‘would’ve.’ Which should have been written ‘would’ve,’ if you were going to EXACTLY quote the Senator. That failing, a person with knowledge of the English language who wanted to expand the Senator’s comment might have typed ‘would have.’ The phrase ‘would of’ is a mistake, either way. In either case, Mr. Knight is the one who incorrectly wrote or typed the quote. And Mr. Knight’s editor would be the person responsible for catching that mistake, and correcting it, before the story appeared here.

  • Art Silver

    Your headline is misleading. Tell us how many cents a gallon this would work out to be. That’s what we need to know.
    This is only an increase in the state TAX. What’s the existing tax?
    If the existing tax is 20 cents a gallon, this 45% increase would be an increase of 9 cents a gallon.
    It is not an 45% increase in gas prices.

    Art

    • Denver George Land

      Art, I did some research, but I’m not sure the information I found is 100% accurate. But, I will pass it along anyway. From what I found, the tax rate for gasoline is 3.5%. A 45% increase in that rate would put it at 5%. The Commissioner of the Revenue is tasked with setting the monetary value of that rate twice a year, based on the statewide average price. That value is currently $0.111 per gallon. The 45% increase, to 5%, would put the monetary value of the tax at $0.15 per gallon, or a net increase of slightly less than a nickel per gallon.

      Again, this was quick research, and I have not had time to vet the accuracy of the information, though I think it is somewhat reliable.

  • Matt Moore

    So since they can’t steal Money from us on the internet. They are going to steal it from us at the pump, Since everybody has a car i guess that’s more profitable for the Criminal politicians.

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