Military planning security changes to alert service-members to threats more quickly

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - The Department of Defense is planning to introduce new security measures aimed at keeping service members safe.

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter delivers remarks during the change of command ceremony between Adm. Bill Gortney, outgoing commander, North American Aerospace Defense and commander, U.S. Northern Command, and Air Force Gen. Lori Robinson at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., May 13, 2016 . (Photo by Senior Master Sgt. Adrian Cadiz)(Released)

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter delivers remarks during the change of command ceremony between Adm. Bill Gortney, outgoing commander, North American Aerospace Defense and commander, U.S. Northern Command, and Air Force Gen. Lori Robinson at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., May 13, 2016 . (Photo by Senior Master Sgt. Adrian Cadiz)(Released)

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter talked about the plans during the NORAD/NORTHCOM Change of Command Ceremony in Colorado Springs, Colorado on Friday.

The changes come as a direct result of the 2015 shootings at two military installations in Chattanooga, Tennessee that killed four Marines and one Sailor.

"Providing greater force protection for men and women serving today is one way we honor those service members who lost their lives," Carter stated.

In the months since the attacks, Carter said protection has been stepped up both on base and at off-base installations, including stronger physical security systems, better alarms, reinforced doors and additional ways to exit during an emergency.

"We're also introducing a mass warning and notification capability to broadcast threats quickly and broadly, notifying DOD personnel within a 20-mile radius of a threat within minutes. That's a direct response to Chattanooga, where the killer targeted two facilities 11 miles apart within the span of 12 minutes," Carter explained.

An additional $80 million in force protection was spent this year and an additional $100 million more will be spent over the next two years, according to the Department of Defense.